Control and hazard reduction

7.1 Identification of species causing a hazard is the key in controlling the hazard.  Identification of species may provide clues to habits and behaviour that, in turn, may indicate an effective control method for them.  For example, species will need to access food stores or prey, and may migrate on a daily basis to achieve this. Interference with migratory pattern may divert wildlife away from aerodromes.  Similarly, patterns used by wildlife in seeking drinking water, shelter or nesting and in reproduction may be exploited for wildlife hazard control measures.  For example, grass may be cut to remove cover, or left to grow to deter flocking or swarming.  Similarly, infilling of stagnant bodies of water may reduce flocking of waterfowl and reduce breeding facilities for airborne insects such as mosquitoes and mayfly upon which birds may feed.

7.2 Introduction of predator species may be considered for some species, but this must be considered very carefully so as not to introduce a greater hazard from the predator species, and to ensure the efficacy of deterrence.

7.3 Cooperation with external agencies may also be required.  For example, local authorities should be discouraged from locating landfill and other waste handling facilities near aerodromes.  This will remove readily available sources of food and nesting material.  Similarly food outlets operating on and near the aerodrome must ensure that their waste is not left where it can attract wildlife.

7.4 Local farmers should also be discouraged from growing crops or farming livestock that may attract local and migratory species.

7.5 Ultimately culling of wildlife may be required where there is a hazard that does not respond to other measures.

7.6 A Wildlife Management Programme will enable an aerodrome operator to track wildlife incursions and incidents, and will, over time, reveal which measures are effective.  This will allow the operator to concentrate on the most effective measures; to introduce new methods where existing measures prove ineffective; or to justify introduction of more contentious measures where necessary.

7.7 Management action should always target the removal of attractants on and off airfield (which may conflict with off-airfield conservation initiatives), deterrence of hazardous species away from the aerodrome (harassment) and if necessary lethal control of persistent individuals or to reinforce the effectiveness of non-lethal methods.


Change Information

Second issue provides a general update and more guidance on the structure and content of a wildlife management plan.

Third issue fixes broken hyperlinks.

Fourth edition changes terminology to reflect ICAO, and corrects the document serial number.

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