Risk identification

6.1 Once the wildlife threats have been identified, it is possible to understand and assess the risks relating to the wildlife activity on, and in the vicinity of, the aerodrome and therefore develop a suitable management plan to reduce those risks and/or probabilities of wildlife strike.  The assessment will enable the strike hazardous species to be identified and management action prioritised.

6.2 The aerodrome operator should develop and maintain a systematic method of obtaining information regarding wildlife strike hazardous species and habitats on, and in the vicinity of, the aerodrome on a regular basis.  This should include:

(a) assessing the hazards posed by wildlife in the context of aircraft operations;

(b) analysis of wildlife strike records to identify how many of each species have been struck;

(c) identification of wildlife more likely to cause damage to aircraft, such as flocking birds and larger heavier species; and

(d) development of a risk assessment methodology to inform the wildlife control programme.

6.3 To set a baseline against which to assess the effectiveness of any future wildlife hazard management plan, the background level of wildlife presence, in the absence of any control measures, should be determined.

6.4 A risk assessment should then be conducted to provide a quantifiable benchmark that can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of control measures on a repeatable basis.  This should include information such that:

(a) each wildlife strike species can be assessed in detail;

(b) each risk can be quantified in the short and long term, dependent upon wildlife population and seasonal changes;

(c) the potential risks can be assessed on a comparable basis;

(d) the continuing risk can be monitored; and

(e) control actions can be focused in a structured manner.

6.5 Standard risk assessment methods should be applied to the information gathered to determine risks and help prioritise the control efforts efficiently.

6.6 The assessment should take consideration of the species involved, including size and numbers (e.g. solitary or in flocks) and an assessment of the likely (aircraft damage) severity of the outcome of a wildlife strike, and assessment of the frequency of serious multiple wildlife strikes.


Change Information

Second issue provides a general update and more guidance on the structure and content of a wildlife management plan.

Third issue fixes broken hyperlinks.

Fourth edition changes terminology to reflect ICAO, and corrects the document serial number.

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